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18th DECEMBER 1986
 
 
SAVED BY DUO
   

   

AMBULANCE MEN... DYFFRIG LEWIS (RIGHT) AND WINSTON WATTS ARE PICTURED WITH THE EQUIPMENT WHICH HELPED TO BRING MISS MORGAN "BACK FORM THE DEAD"

   

 

THE SCENE IN COLLEGE STREET, AMMANFORD AS MISS MORGAN IS HANDED OVER BY FIREMEN TO THE AMBULANCE SERVICE.

   

STORY:
RICHARD SHARPE

PHOTO:
ROBERT TREHARNE

   

RESCUERS PRAISED FOR THEIR ACTIONS

TWO ambulancemen who saved the life of an Ammanford spinster rescued by firemen from her smoke-filled home may be recommended for a national award.

Ambulancemen Dyffrig Lewis and Winston Watts battled for 25 minutes last Wednesday to bring retired teacher Miss Enid Morgan “back from the dead” outside her house in College Street.

“Without their prompt and sustained action, Miss Morgan would almost certainly have died,” Mr. Paul Kirkman, East Dyfed Health Authority's chief ambulance officer said this week.

Mr. Kirkman added that he would be personally commending Mr. Lewis (40) of Cwmaman Road, Glanaman, and Mr. Watts (44) of Coronation Avenue, Llanelli, for actions “over and above the call of duty.”

And he said the two men nay be recommended for the President's Award of the Association of Chief Ambulance Officers.

“It is most unusual for a patient to be revived after such a long time,” Mr. Kirkman said. “Certainly it is the longest period I have heard of.”

Ammanford GP Dr. David Murfin, who was called to the scene, said he thought Miss Morgan (54) was dead. “I was just about to tell the ambulancemen to stop trying to revive her when she coughed and came back to life,” he said.

“I was called to make a decision and , frankly, I thought the time had come when they should not persevere with their efforts.

Dr. Murfin added that Mr. Lewis and Mr. Watts were “a real credit to the service.

Miss Morgan, who was rescuer by firemen wearing breathing apparatus, had suffered from the thick black fumes which filled her burning bedroom.

Mr. Watts said this week: “There was no pulse and she had stopped breathing, so we immediately began mouth-to-mouth and cardiac massage.

“We kept it up for 17 minutes and then Dr. Murfin arrived. He thought we were losing the battle, because there was no reaction.”

But the two ambulancemen carried on – this time with the help of modern breathing aids. “We were over the moon when she came round,” Mr. Watts added.

Miss Morgan was still in a critical condition at Llanelli General Hospital.

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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